Sorry, Penny, But It Just Shows How Britain Has Changed For The Worst…

Penny Anderson shows why she’s a ‘starving’ writer:

People in Britain are battling each other for cut-price food.

What, regularly? Come off it! This is just one filmed incident.

I know it goes against the grain, but let’s not have the hyperbole laid on too thick right from the start…

It might come as a shock to anyone who imagines that writers fly to work in their own helicopter with truffle sandwiches for lunch, but I survive on food found in the supermarket reduced aisle.

Beats starving in a garret, though?

Every day, I see shoppers who desperately need these bargains, since for many, it’s the only possibility of eating properly. After all, a huge pack of reduced mince or chicken is a good source of protein lasting across several days if cooked and eked-out properly. But this level of thriftiness is exhausting, which might explain the frayed tempers of the Northampton food-scrum.

It’s ‘exhausting’ to have to cook proper meals? Well, I suppose that explains quite a lot. Personally, I find it relaxing and therapeutic, but then, I’m not a ‘professional writer’.

The Northampton all-in, food wrestle-mania occurred, I suspect, when informal protocols which bring order to the demeaning experience of hanging around trying to look busy while waiting for the soup to be reduced, were ignored.

You mean, old fashioned English manners?

Well, yes. Observe any inner-city bus queue and you’ll see they are things of the past. Similarly, watch any urban crowd getting on a train or in a lift – no longer do you wait politely for those inside to disembark – it’s every man & woman for themselves.

Personally, one vital guideline, and a rule which makes me furious whenever I see it being ignored, is don’t be greedy. If you see massive packs of organic vintage cheddar for 20p (this has happened) please don’t hog them all. I’ve witnessed people loading stacks of gourmet pizzas into the boot of a new BMW, which if owned by the loader seemed to me a little unfair.

Why? The food’s there for anyone who wants to buy it, isn’t it? I’m pretty sure if they labelled it ‘poverty ONLY’ you’d complain.

The etiquette of poverty-induced budget food-hunting decrees that you don’t barge in and grab stuff over the heads of those too polite to let go of their manners.

Back to manners again. Well, take a look at that crowd, Penny. You expect old English manners from them? I don’t.

And that’s the problem. Not ‘poverty’.

7 comments for “Sorry, Penny, But It Just Shows How Britain Has Changed For The Worst…

  1. July 3, 2015 at 12:23 pm

    Just before Christmas last year, I tottered along to my local Tesco pretty late, because, as usual, I had forgotten something which would be needed for the next days events; e.g. pigging out, troughing,; that sort of thing.

    Now As i walked down the main aisle, i noticed a whole bunch of store employees standing between two sets of people, both were intent on edging ever closer to the chilled desserts, apple pies and custards shelves, as the ‘reduced labels’ were being slotted on to the products at the end of the trading day.

    It is true, these two sets, presumably of families, were intent on battling to gain access to cheap cream cakes, chilled pies, custards and other alleged ‘goodies’. The store people had, an onlooker told me, already had to physically separate both sets of people even before the label setter had appeared, as shoving and pushing had already broken out.

    The day before Christmas, the one time of the year when we are all supposed to remember the Christmas Story, and they were preparing to do battle.

    And these morons have exactly the same voting power as I!

    • July 12, 2015 at 7:53 am

      🙁

  2. July 3, 2015 at 1:51 pm

    “The Northampton all-in, food wrestle-mania occurred, I suspect, when informal protocols which bring order to the demeaning experience of hanging around trying to look busy while waiting for the soup to be reduced, were ignored.”

    I often pick up bargains in Sainsburys, but one Sunday I went in there were a whole big bunch of various pies on offer. Two people were looking at stuff on the higher shelf while eyeing up these pies on the bottom, too stuck up to just grab one while people were watching.

    I walked up, scooped the whole shelfload into my basket and fucked off. I came away with about twenty pies and pasties all for about 20 – 30p each.

  3. July 3, 2015 at 3:02 pm

    Never see any of that in Tasmania, and we have BOGANS !

  4. Bill Quango MP
    July 3, 2015 at 3:14 pm

    As an employer of many ex-supermarket staff I had a quick ask round the office.

    This is a daily occurrence. And has been for over twenty years, says one ex-baker. He had a queue waiting for the bread sale, who would fight for the loafs.
    All the people asked, about 10, said this happens each day and is so bad that they have to rota whose job it is to put the reduced goods out.
    And its not just food. Batteries, toothpaste, pens – anything at all.

    Consensus seems to be some of these people are car boot and ebay resellers. Some are quite poor, but most are just a bit mentally ill. Same people each day, buying up any old stuff. Suspected hoarders.

    When i asked the specific, ‘are they starving?’ the answer was laughter.
    Which I took as a no.

    So that’s the voice of 10 former supermarket workers in different roles and positions.

    • July 12, 2015 at 7:53 am

      Good grief!

  5. Radical Rodent
    July 3, 2015 at 10:10 pm

    Why go to a supermarket? Get yourself down to the local market; as the end of day approaches, the stall-holders will want to dispose of much of the stock that they might have remaining. Bargains become ten-a-penny, so long as you are not too fussy as to exactly what you get. Bread seems to be about the only foodstuff that does not get a mention, here.

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