Insiders’ analysis of presidential campaign — part 3

This series analyses the 2016 presidential campaign with recaps of Alex Jones Show interviews with Larry Nichols, a Clinton insider from Arkansas days, terminally ill with cancer, and Roger Stone, Trump insider and veteran of five presidential campaigns beginning in 1964. See parts 1 and 2 if you missed them.

Nichols co-created the 1994 film The Clinton Chronicles and Stone co-authored The Clintons’ War on Women, published in 2015.

This post covers interviews from early June up to the Republican National Convention in mid-July.

Early in June, the Democrats had been attacking Donald Trump about the Trump University allegations of fraud and then stopped. On June 8, Roger Stone said it was ironic that Big Media weren’t investigating ‘the epic greed of the Clintons’, specifically the Clinton Global Initiative.

Stone was too confident in saying, ‘I think Trump University is behind us’.

On November 18, Trump settled fraud cases for Trump University for $25m. It was unusual, because he says his first lawyer and fixer, Roy Cohn — who introduced Trump to Stone in 1979 — always told him never to settle out of court. It set too much of a precedent for any future cases. However, unusual circumstances — being elected the 45th president of the United States — call for unusual courses of action. USA Today reported:

Trump’s defense team said the decision was made to settle so that years of potential litigation could be avoided.

“This would have gone on for a long, long time and would have been a very significant distraction,” said Daniel M. Petrocelli, the lead attorney who represented Trump in the case.

Trump had publicly vowed not to settle the lawsuits and suggested at one point during his presidential campaign that he might reopen the school, which closed in 2010. He told supporters at a May rally that he would come to San Diego to testify after winning the presidency.

“I could have settled this case numerous times, but I don’t want to settle cases when we’re right. I don’t believe in it. And when you start settling cases, you know what happens? Everybody sues you because you get known as a settler. One thing about me, I am not known as a settler,” Trump said at the time.

However, an exclusive analysis by USA TODAY of more than 4,000 lawsuits involving Trump and his companies over the years shows that just isn’t true.

USA TODAY tracked down the records in thousands of Trump’s court battles dating back to the 1980s, in courts coast to coast, and found that the business mogul settled lawsuits at least 259 times. Almost 200 of those were cases where he and his companies were defendants, although the terms of the settlement agreements often are kept out of court records and plaintiffs are required to sign agreements pledging not to disclose details. In hundreds more cases, court records indicate legal disputes were resolved outside court with the details shielded from public view.

Going back to what was happening at the time of Stone’s interview, Politico and other left-leaning media sites accused Hillary Clinton of stealing the nomination from Bernie Sanders with DNC superdelegates. Trump announced that Sanders voters were welcome at his rallies.

Alex Jones then brought up Benghazi. Stone was mistakenly confident that Trump would talk about that, but he never did. (I think Trump is waiting for the inauguration. Watch for action afterwards.)

Stone said he was writing about Huma Abedin for Breitbart and that she could well be associated with the Saudis. She wears expensive handbags. She edited radical Muslim publications. Stone wondered if she was a spy. He said that she had a special waiver to receive a State Department salary, money from Teneo and money from the Clinton Foundation. Stone asked how much information has she seen from all three entities.

Stone wrote several Breitbart articles about Huma which were published on June 13, June 15 (here and here), August 18 and August 21.

On June 9, Jones spoke with Larry Nichols, who said he had no official relationship with Trump. However, he did say that Trump will tear the establishment apart if he wins the election. He brought up Vince Foster again and said the casework must be revisted, because it will ‘be a force multiplier’. Even if the media discredit the story, it will spread. Jones said that the Foster case could be construed as ‘high treason’.

Nichols talked about Hillary, saying that opposing forces against her will go on and on; this must continue. He said there are FBI files that can be investigated. If so, ‘there will be no quarter offered’.

He did not think there was any chance she would be indicted for Benghazi.

In terms of Trump’s popularity, Nichols had no firm evidence but his gut was telling him that, at that time, voter support was 40% each for Trump and Hillary and 20% undecided.

Nichols thought that Trump should focus on North Korea’s uranium (including nuclear backpacks), which he called ‘a game changer’. Interestingly enough, three months later, Big Media picked up on it: Fox News, BBC News, Reuters and Huffington Post. Although Trump had talked about North Korea earlier in the year, he made scant mention after that.

On June 13, Stone’s first Huma Abedin article appeared on Breitbart (see above). Before he and Jones discussed her, however, Stone was intent on talking about how awful the Clintons were to Bill’s women. He had just launched a petition called Stop The Silence and said that if the Clintons are innocent, they should speak up. He said this issue undermined her stance as a supporter of women’s issues.

Stone then told listeners that Trump would turn 70 on June 14 — Flag Day.

Talk then turned to Abedin and her Saudi connections. Stone said that the Trump campaign would be validated by talking about ISIS, which Hillary, Obama and Bush created through their foreign policies. Stone said he was being verbally attacked for saying that Abedin is very well connected and is tied to groups that funded Bin Laden. Stone wanted to know her relationships with some of these people, because her family have worked for them. He also said that the Saudis could be contributing as much as 20% of Hillary’s campaign money. Stone said the exact nature of the relationship between Huma and Hillary was unclear.

The Orlando gay nightclub shooting had taken place the day before. Jones asked what Stone thought of gays and Trump. Stone replied that gays have the same concerns as other Americans, particularly security and employment. Consequently, he saw them as ideal Trump supporters. (After Orlando, a number of gays began supporting Trump because Hillary refused to address radical Islam. Of course, Big Media ignored this. It wasn’t until October 30, when a group of gays gave him a rainbow flag with ‘LGBTs for Trump’ written on it, that they began to take notice.)

Protests also came up. Stone said the Left cannot understand that protests only help Trump. They think that only the number of protesters and illegal voters matter. He added that Hillary agrees with that premise. He also reminded listeners that she is involved in epic corruption.

Stone reiterated that Trump continues to tell the truth, yet the Left call him a conspiracy theorist. That said, he thought that Trump’s response to the Orlando shooting made June 13 his best day ever in dominating the dialogue. America does need to secure the border.

Before Stone went on the air on July 13, Alex Jones began talking about what could happen on November 8. He said that Hillary could steal the election. He also pointed out that Trump was on his own in the GOP. ‘Trump has bucked the system’ and they had demonised him for it. He had no support from ‘big money’ people at that point. (Sheldon Adelson said he would commit, but, for whatever reason, that did not materialise.)

Stone appeared wearing a seersucker jacket. He was pumped, talking about what ‘an exciting day’ it was: ‘We are literally on the verge of pulling our country back!’

At that time, Trump was about to make his VP choice. Stone said that only Trump could choose that person. Stone said, quoting his idol Richard Nixon, that was because it has to be ‘somebody who can’t hurt you’. The day before Hillary publicly surmised it would be Mike Flynn. Stone thought it could be Newt Gingrich. (Thank goodness it turned out to be Mike Pence.)

Stone went on to say that Nixon considered Gingrich ‘a Rockefeller guy’. Stone offered another possibility: Jeff Sessions. He said there was one caveat in Trump’s choice: did he want an attack dog? He didn’t think so. He thought Trump would want to take the Clintons on by himself.

Stone said that the amount of small contributions the Trump campaign had received in June was incredible: $51m. (Much of that rolled in post-Orlando.)

Bernie Sanders had just bowed out of the Democratic race. Stone said it was a big disappointment to see him endorse Hillary. He was ‘just another hack politician’. Stone thought that trade could be a key argument to win over Sanders supporters.

Talk turned to the upcoming convention in Cleveland. Stone said that 10,000 professional agitators were expected. He said that, no matter what happened, it was essential for Trump supporters to ‘turn the other cheek’. Jones said that a number of ‘false flags’ were expected that week. Stone was dreading the ‘intermixing’ of protest groups with Republican groups outside Quicken Arena. He added that he had to get special security clearance for his own book signings in Euclid and other suburban locations.

Stone said that Cleveland would be a life-risking, dangerous, ‘historic’ event, an opportunity ‘to stand up and be counted’, especially at an event at Settlers Park on Monday, July 18. Bikers for Trump would also be outdoors at the convention. Diamond and Silk were asked to speak at the convention but declined. (As it turned out, Cleveland went off without a hitch. It was Philadelphia — during the Democratic National Convention — where angry protests took place.)

Stone had hoped that Trump would talk about getting 9/11 and the missing 28 pages into the GOP platform because that would be so anti-Bush it would be ‘core Trumpism’. However, he said, it had been ‘rejected’. Stone said he was sure Abedin was a Saudi handler. He said that John McCain took Saudi money for his campaign. He thought McCain’s opponent in Arizona could use this as leverage. (If it happened, it was unsuccessful.)

The conversation turned to polling. Stone thought Trump was ahead ‘in a number of key states’, including Florida.

Stone said Reince Priebus went ‘out of his mind’ when he found out Mike Flynn was scheduled to address the convention. However, Stone pointed out, Flynn was not a registered Democrat and ‘he has proven himself to be a man of guts’.

The next post will be about the GOP convention.

You can see and read more of Stone at Stone Cold Truth.

3 comments for “Insiders’ analysis of presidential campaign — part 3

  1. November 20, 2016 at 7:32 pm

    The story continues.

    • November 20, 2016 at 11:59 pm

      You bet.

      Larry Nichols is on with Alex Jones as I write. He said, ‘Alex, we won a battle [the election]. But the war ain’t over.’

      He was disgusted with these elitists who think they are above the law, preening their intellect and privilege over ‘rednecks’ (Larry used the word). They’re exempt from the law. ‘Let me tell you, even in my decrepit state, if they come round here, I’ll sort ’em out.’

      He urged all Trump voters to continue supporting him. This looks like a triumphant time for Trump, but not only does he have a lot of people to meet with, including frenemies, he also has his and his family’s safety to watch out for. Yes, he has the Secret Service (and a highly specialised security detail), but anything could happen. Larry feels confident they can handle every situation. He’s no doubt right, but it’s a lot of added pressure.

      Eight years ago, the present incumbent did not have to worry about the possible threats Trump does today.

      Then there are the relentless slings and arrows from Big Media.

      The conversation shifted to cabinet picks. Larry knows Jeff Sessions personally: ‘If there’s a man who’s kept his word to me … and to the country … it’s Jeff Sessions’.

      Larry also said it’s vital Americans support states’ rights. It’s the only way to keep the swamp drained once Trump gets to work.

      Who can relax until Inauguration Day? It will be tough for me.

  2. November 21, 2016 at 12:00 am

    You bet.

    Larry Nichols is on with Alex Jones as I write. He said, ‘Alex, we won a battle [the election]. But the war ain’t over.’

    He was disgusted with these elitists who think they are above the law, preening their intellect and privilege over ‘rednecks’ (Larry used the word). They’re exempt from the law. ‘Let me tell you, even in my decrepit state, if they come round here, I’ll sort ’em out.’

    He urged all Trump voters to continue supporting him. This looks like a triumphant time for Trump, but not only does he have a lot of people to meet with, including frenemies, he also has his and his family’s safety to watch out for. Yes, he has the Secret Service (and a highly specialised security detail), but anything could happen. Larry feels confident they can handle every situation. He’s no doubt right, but it’s a lot of added pressure.

    Eight years ago, the present incumbent did not have to worry about the possible threats Trump does today.

    Then there are the relentless slings and arrows from Big Media.

    The conversation shifted to cabinet picks. Larry knows Jeff Sessions personally: ‘If there’s a man who’s kept his word to me … and to the country … it’s Jeff Sessions’.

    Larry also said it’s vital Americans support states’ rights. It’s the only way to keep the swamp drained once Trump gets to work.

    Who can relax until Inauguration Day? I will find it difficult.

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