Councils force veterans to sleep rough

The Covenant, signed by every local authority, is supposed to give military heroes priority housing and health care – but not only are veterans being forced to sleep rough, they are waiting years for treatment for mental problems caused by their stint in the forces.

There is £30m worth of funding made available by Government, but many councils are not even applying for it, despite desperate, traumatised veterans begging for help.

Sign the Homes for Heroes petition to force Government to look after our brave veterans: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/182429

7 comments for “Councils force veterans to sleep rough

  1. February 13, 2017 at 11:14 am

    I often am reminded that bad decisions, made by politicians for political reasons, rebound long after the memories fade.

    The famous <a href="https://mikecunningham.wordpress.com/2009/03/22/when-in-doubt-shut-the-fk-up/ "'Corporal Fox' BNP video, which held the very true statement that over 300,000 illegal immigrants and bogus asylum seekers were given housing, funds and cash during the Labour years, and the squaddies who fought and suffered whilst wearing the British Army cap badges were abandoned on the streets.

    The entire Defence housing estate, worth millions of pounds Sterling, was hastily sold off to a bunch of hedge-funds (I think), and the resulting disgrace of soldiers’ families having to live in badly-maintained and totally squalid conditions is a direct result of that sale.

  2. February 13, 2017 at 11:16 am

    I often am reminded that bad decisions, made by politicians for political reasons, rebound long after the memories fade.

    The famous <a href="https://mikecunningham.wordpress.com/2009/03/22/when-in-doubt-shut-the-fk-up/ "'Corporal Fox' BNP video, which held the very true statement that over 300,000 illegal immigrants and bogus asylum seekers were given housing, funds and cash during the Labour years, and the squaddies who fought and suffered whilst wearing the British Army cap badges were abandoned on the streets.

    The entire Defence housing estate, worth millions of pounds Sterling, was hastily sold off to a bunch of hedge-funds (I think), and the resulting disgrace of soldiers’ families having to live in badly-maintained and totally squalid conditions is a direct result of that sale.

  3. Penseivat
    February 13, 2017 at 12:24 pm

    For over 20 years I lived in soldier’s married quarters in various countries, but mainly in the UK. There was a “march in” where every little thing was counted and checked, right down to the number of teaspoons. We were expected to keep the place clean as it could inspected at any time by the BIA (Barrack Inventory Accountants), many of whom were ex military and so knew what to look for. At he end of your tour you had the “march out”, where you were expected to have the quarter looking as though no one had ever lived there (even down to taking the side panels off the cooker and cleaning behind them) or having to pay for extra cleaning if it didn’t meet the required standard. The rent, no matter where you lived in the world, was the equivalent of an average UK council house or flat of that size. Over the years, we had visitors from other military forces, German, French, American, Australian, or Hong Kong Police officers and they all claimed the standard and quality of UK military quarters outshone their own. Long after I retired, I read that the Government had sold them off to a private concern in order to save money (or raise funds to temporarily pay for incompetent and wasteful spending on other, non military, projects) but didn’t think too much about it. That is, until I visited the son of an ex colleague who had followed in his Dad’s footsteps. His married accommodation was worse than the sub standard quarters some would volunteer to occupy at a reduced quartering charge, yet it was thought to be one of the better ones in that area.
    To say that successive governments, both local and national, have callously disregarded the military covenant is putting it mildly. If only I had the power to make the Ministers and Secretaries of State, and their minions, live in these soldier’s married quarters for their term in office.
    On a similar note, when I got married, I was advised to register as a military applicant for a council house with my local (north eastern) authority, which I did. Fortunately, my wife and I were able to buy a house when I left the Army, and so wrote to the council, withdrawing my application. To my surprise, I received a reply, thanking me for letting them know, and advising me that this would allow another military applicant to move one step up the waiting list, which suggests there was a separate list for such applicants. Would that it were so today.

    • February 14, 2017 at 12:03 am

      Carrying on the fine tradition of screwing Tommy. ‘Twas ever thus. I can recall, way back admittedly (in the Wilson era) holding ‘pay parades’ when my lads would line up to get their wages. To each with their notes and coins I would give a chit to take to the Post Office to claim ‘supplementary benefits’. The pay was below the poverty line.

  4. Penseivat
    February 13, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    To clarify the ‘military applicant’ waiting lists that some councils had, the council would expect something like 6 month’s notice of termination of military service and priority would be given to try and have suitable council accommodation available on discharge. The waiting list took length of military service and period of prior notification into account, to prevent people joining the military for just 3 years to jump the general housing queue, as well as local connections, such as being born there and having family in the area. Mind you, that was over 25 years ago.
    Sorry, should have put that in the previous entry.

  5. February 13, 2017 at 10:38 pm

    I’m just amazed how they can get away with it. Appalled.

  6. Errol
    February 15, 2017 at 7:46 pm

    It should be simple: for every homeless person in the city/county, councillors and ‘portfolio holders’ lose £12,000 in pay. Money appropriated and given to the homeless person.

    When there are councillors taking over a quarter of a million in salary, another £150,000 in pension and putting everything from their cheese and wine to banjo lessons to their damned cars on expenses it’s time they felt the pain they cause others in a more direct fashion.

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