Now what about the EU pensions of the nationals of withdrawing nation states

The public strikes this week over the pensions of people paid from the public purse has caused much fascinating and long overdue debate about one messy area of Britain’s public life. Another will soon appear.

It is daily becoming ever more certain that some countries will be forced to withdraw from the failed Euro currency. The likely response of those in the so-called core, so far Triple A credit rated member states is being promoted as a full fiscal union, which of necessity will exclude Britain. The countries leaving the Euro currency such as, for example, Greece, may classify themselves as being on temporary absence and in view of their minor impact, may perhaps receive special terms for their nationals who have earned EU pension entitlements. Such is highly unlikely to be the case for British nationals!

Countries leaving the Euro currency will also be better placed than Britain, in that they will be forced to find a new currency for their period of exclusion. Government obligations incurred in Euros will therefore be much more easily reneged upon. Britain, one presumes, will soldier on with the pound sterling, legally stuck with all the excessive obligations incurred during the years of EU inspired insanity. Britain happily will seem to be getting a different opportunity for root and branch reform of its governance, due to the passage of time (read here), a topic to which I will return at length both here and on Ironies Too during the Christmas/New Year break!

It would be timely for the country to start detailed consideration of these very difficult and likely hugely fractious areas of potentially great disputation. As a first step I would suggest a small cross-party committee of clear thinking politicians, be appointed to identify the areas of greatest difficulty likely to arise following our withdrawal from the EU and the changes in public administration that will be immediately required. My own selection for such a team would be for three long term and well known euro critical MPs (such as John Redwood / Bill Cash and Kate Hoey  / Gisele Stewart) equally drawn from Labour and Conservative ranks, with an independent, non-establishment, non-political also known euro-sceptic Chairperson.

8 comments for “Now what about the EU pensions of the nationals of withdrawing nation states

  1. Mudplugger
    December 1, 2011 at 3:14 pm

    I nominate Jeremy Clarkson as Chairperson.

    • December 1, 2011 at 6:00 pm

      I think he’d rather be the armorer. :mrgreen:

  2. WitteringsfromWitney
    December 1, 2011 at 5:09 pm

    “Britain happily will seem to be getting a different opportunity for root and branch reform of its governance……….a topic to which I will return at length both here and on Ironies Too during the Christmas/New Year break!”

    Now in view of what I and Richard North have been discussing lately on our respective blogs, this could get interesting indeed!

  3. Edward Spalton
    December 1, 2011 at 6:00 pm

    What is required is a Truth and Retribution Commission. I would nominate Judge Jeffreys for England and Lord Braxfield for Scotland

    • December 2, 2011 at 8:04 am

      Edward, you have covered my planned output of postings for the coming holiday season in one line and a half! Back to drafting!

  4. December 1, 2011 at 11:13 pm

    I’m not malicious or anything, but telling the likes of Mandy, Patten and Kinnock that we aren’t paying their seven figure pensions any more would cheer me up no end.

  5. December 2, 2011 at 2:27 am

    The EU will find a way to continue paying the pensions of ‘Mandy, Patten and Kinnock’ and that Cathy Ashton in the future as it is their way of ensuring EU loyalty when voting in national legislatures (ie House of Lords) as traitors in the pay of a foreign entity.

    • December 2, 2011 at 8:13 am

      Assuming that we have withdrawn, due to the economic crisis, I am not so certain of that fact as you seem banned.

      Perhaps the senior Civil Service pensioners will agree cuts to their own higher paid pension packets so that the likes of the three mentioned can continue to lounge in luxury?

      MEPs who mainly served to feed EU funding back to their parties, have a supposedly private scheme. If the EU gets really vindictive and withdraws their payments, presumably the political parties themselves will fund their ex-MEP pensioners – but that could prove tricky for the LibDems and UKIP, both of which parties are almost entirely dependent upon EU funding. 😛

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