Eggs — again!

Edwina Currie has a lot of explaining to do.

Since 1988, the British public have been afraid of eggs, ever since her warning that

most of the egg production in this country, sadly, is now affected with salmonella.

Give over. Use some of Granny’s common sense and figure out how old it is:

– Open the carton in the shop. Do they smell? If so, put the carton back and try another.

– Buy and refrigerate fresh ones.  If you haven’t used any for a few weeks, open the carton. Do they smell? If so, discard them. If not, use them in cakes or cooked egg recipes (e.g. omelettes, hard boiled eggs).

– Try the water test. Telegraph commenter stratfordtony (December 15 08:23 AM) advises:

Carefully lower your eggs into fresh cold water (do not use salted water) using a spoon:

If the egg stays at the bottom – it is fresh

If the egg is at an angle on the bottom – it is still fresh and good to eat.

If the egg stands on its pointed end at the bottom  – it is still safe to eat but best used for baking and making hard-cooked eggs.

If the egg floats – they’re stale and best discarded.

That said, I’ve never had a problem with eggs.

Someone commenting on that Telegraph article complained that Tesco sells old eggs. Well, I’ve bought the majority of my eggs at Tesco over the past 21 years and have never had a problem.

Pah.

The big news here from the latest FSA (Food Standards Authority) guidelines which now allow for a couple of days’ leeway after the egg expiry date is that

the change in guidelines was “great” news for the egg industry.

Good for them. I mean that most sincerely. In 2007 that the British Egg Information Service wanted to get a new advert on television promoting this small yet mighty source of nutrition on which we once powered the Western world when we still ate hot breakfasts.  Now look at us: a bunch of pomo jessies.

They couldn’t even get the thing on the air — even with black and white reruns of Tony Hancock enjoying eggs and soldiers.  Oh, eggs — the horror!

The Daily Mail reported (emphases mine):

the Government watchdog has blocked it on the grounds that eating an egg for breakfast every day does not constitute a healthy diet.

Yesterday the decision was attacked by the egg industry, nutritionists and author Fay Weldon, who helped coin the famous slogan as a young advertising executive.

She said: “I think the ruling is absurd. We seem to have been tainted by all the health and safety laws. Eggs were enormously healthy compared to what people were eating in the 1950s and a great form of protein.

“If they are going to ban egg adverts, then I think they should ban all car adverts because cars really are dangerous – and bad for the environment” …

Before adverts can be screened on national television, they must be approved by the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre, which was set up by Ofcom – the broadcasting standards watchdog – to enforce statutory codes of practice.

After lengthy debate about the campaign, the BACC decided the adverts do not comply with the broadcast advertising code.

In a written reply, it said: “This concept of eating eggs every day for breakfast unfortunately goes against what is now the generally accepted advice of eating a varied diet. We therefore could not approve the ads for broadcast.”

Nutritionist Cath Macdonald said: “Eggs are a great choice for all the family, providing plenty of vitamins and minerals including calcium for strong teeth and bones and vitamin A for growth and development. They are also relatively low in saturated fat.”

Although I don’t have any eggs boiling right now, I do have some blood which is!

Edwina Currie is responsible for casting aspersions on one of the greatest food sources ever — the humble egg.

Follow your doctor’s advice, by all means. But if you don’t need to follow a physician’s orders, then eat eggs and may you be in the best of health as a result.  They are great for strengthening hair and fingernails as well as keeping wrinkles at bay.  They help us stay younger in many ways — internally as well as externally.

13 comments for “Eggs — again!

  1. ian
    December 17, 2011 at 7:30 am

    Ofcom can’t police YouTube ads. Let’s boycott telly and watch vids with egg ads instead.

  2. December 17, 2011 at 7:35 am

    I think they are on a hiding to nothing. Many of my work colleagues are now keeping chicken 🙂

    • December 17, 2011 at 9:46 am

      Brilliant! 🙂

  3. mikebravo
    December 17, 2011 at 11:57 am

    I have read that salmonella has never been found inside an unbroken egg. It is only ever on the outside.
    Wash your hands after touching egg shells and raw chicken and ignore politicians as usual.

  4. Rossa
    December 17, 2011 at 2:49 pm

    Buy our eggs from the local farm. Not only cheaper and fresher they are filthy dirty. Need a good scrub to get rid of pieces of straw stuck on with bits of chicken sh*t! He can’t produce enough of them (well his chickens can’t), only 80-90 dozen a week.

    Fortunately for us the local health Nazis haven’t intervened with silly rules and regs. And he operates an honesty box for them. One of those community services that are becoming so rare these days.

    Oh and if you’re doing a bit of baking he’ll let you have the ones with cracked shells free. My Lemon Drizzle cake last weekend was a lovely sunny yellow from the gorgeous orange yolks…..Yum!

  5. Dave G
    December 17, 2011 at 6:17 pm

    Recently got ourselves four laying hens and can say that if you get the chance to own your own – DO IT! The difference in quality between shop-bought is enormous.
    On another tack, a local sarnie shop had the health hitlers in one day and they complained that the eggs being used should be kept refigerated – until the shopkeep pointed out that the supermarkets didn’t seem to bother…..

  6. Able
    December 18, 2011 at 1:37 am

    Just wondering, is there a food that is unequivocally seen, and always seen, as good for you by these idiots? Nope, didn’t think so. Well. if they would only follow their own advice we’d finally be rid of the meddling a*** holes, as they’d starve to death.

    Personally I think it’s too good for them, and to quote someone better with words than I, I hope they all die from unexpected crotch fires.

  7. Voice of Reason
    December 18, 2011 at 4:20 am

    We mostly use our own eggs. As others said above, the salmonella is on the outside of the eggs. Wash them right before use, and they are fine. Do it too soon, and the water permeates the eggshell. Eggs stay fine unrefrigerted for up to 6 weeks.

    • December 18, 2011 at 9:28 am

      Thank you for the useful advice!

  8. December 18, 2011 at 1:48 pm

    Edwina has a great track record, doesn’t she, so why would we listen to anything she says?

    • December 18, 2011 at 10:51 pm

      Whilst I accept what you are saying, James, the problem is that other organisations pick up on what someone (Currie) said over 20 years ago. Then we have a situation. Currie’s campaign in the late ’80s stuck, because she went on about it for a prolonged period of time. I read about it daily as it unfolded in the FT, of all places.

      This is the problem with food and drink crusaders. They have an antipathy towards something, cast a great net and manage to catch every Tom, Dick and Harry who thinks the same way. Ciggies, drink, ‘fatty’ food, eggs — it’s an endless list which goes on and on over decades.

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